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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
J Edu Health Promot 2022,  11:144

The prospective study of change of perception of postgraduate students on objective structured clinical examination in burns and plastic surgery


1 Department of Burns and Plastic Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bathinda, Punjab, India
2 Department of Burns and Plastic Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Rishikesh, Uttarakhand, India

Date of Submission28-Apr-2021
Date of Acceptance10-Jan-2022
Date of Web Publication28-Apr-2022

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mohd Altaf Mir
Department of Burns and Plastic Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences Bathinda - 151 001, Punjab
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jehp.jehp_592_21

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  Abstract 


BACKGROUND: In this study, we attempted to assess the change of perception of postgraduate students on objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in burns and plastic surgery after first five OSCE.
METHODS: A prevalidated feedback questionnaire was used to assess and score the perception of postgraduate students on OSCE in burns and plastic surgery. The opinion of postgraduate students on the feedback questionnaire after first and fifth assessment tests based on OSCE was analyzed. The results were compiled on a data sheet and analyzed using Microsoft Excel and plotted as graphical interpretation. The statistical analysis was done using MedCalc software.
RESULTS: The results of the study showed that there is a positive change in perception of students in favor of monthly assessment based on OSCE in burns and plastic surgery after fifth assessment. The mean students' favorable perception score after the first assessment with was 30.2 ± 2.828 (mean ± standard deviation [SD]) and after fifth assessment, 43 ± 2.828 (mean SD) with Student's test t = 10.119 and P < 0.0001 which is highly significant statistically in favor of OSCE after fifth assessment.
CONCLUSIONS: We observed in our study that the monthly assessment based on OSCE is well accepted by the students of our subspecialty after few assessments; however, further studies are required to augment the evidence.

Keywords: Clinical examination, examination assessment tool, objective structured


How to cite this article:
Mir MA, Chattopadhyay D, Vathulya M, Mago V, Maurya RK, Kapoor A, Rao N. The prospective study of change of perception of postgraduate students on objective structured clinical examination in burns and plastic surgery. J Edu Health Promot 2022;11:144

How to cite this URL:
Mir MA, Chattopadhyay D, Vathulya M, Mago V, Maurya RK, Kapoor A, Rao N. The prospective study of change of perception of postgraduate students on objective structured clinical examination in burns and plastic surgery. J Edu Health Promot [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 May 24];11:144. Available from: https://www.jehp.net/text.asp?2022/11/1/144/344090




  Introduction Top


The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) is being conducted monthly in our institution for student skill assessment in all departments. Periodic assessment of postgraduate students of Magister Chirurgiae (M Ch) burns and plastic surgery postgraduate training program of most medical schools based on different methods is a standard norm. These assessments are important in helping a student to become aware about his shortcomings and hence plan a course correction before appearing for the final assessment. It also helps the teachers in medical education to evaluate the level of interest and appreciation of a subject. The OSCE is interesting tool which we are applying at our institution to test the cumulative knowledge and skills acquired by a student. These assessment tools are to be evaluated for the objectives these are intended for. The prevalidated feedback questionnaire is an essential component of the evaluation system tool to complete the loop to assess the efficacy of that tool of assessment.


  Materials and Methods Top


Study design and setting

The prospective comparative study on the perception of postgraduate students on OSCE was conducted in the postdoctoral department of burns and plastic surgery of our institution from February 2019 to April 2021.

Study participants and sampling

The theoretical knowledge and its application in clinical and practical skills of all ten students of our department were assessed by OSCE stations.

Data collection tool and technique

The OSCE stations included a total of four stations with predefined scenario-one each for soft skills, clinical case and planning, clinical radiology, instruments, and pathological specimen. Each station had a structured question which had to be answered by performing specific skills. The observer had to score the students according to the predefined checklist. Immediately after the examination, a prevalidated feedback questionnaire [Table 1] was used to assess the students' favorable perception score (SFPS) for OSCE in burns and plastic surgery. The written consent from each participant was taken, and the identity of participants has not been revealed at any stage of the study conducted in accordance with the declaration of Helsinki version 2013. The questionnaire used was validated by three independent researchers. The prevalidated questionnaire [Table 1] comprises 15 questions with three response options which are agree, neither agree nor disagree, and disagree. The response agrees, neither agree nor disagree, and disagree carries score of 3, 2, and 1, respectively. The total score from each participant called SFPS by us is calculated accordingly by adding the score against each question. The SFPS for OSCE after first [Table 2] and fifth [Table 3] assessments were compiled on a data sheet and analyzed using Microsoft Excel and plotted as graphical interpretation.
Table 1: Questionnaire for survey on the perception of postgraduate students after first and fifth objective structured clinical examination in burns and plastic surgery

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Table 2: Students' favorable perception score after first objective structured clinical examination in burns and plastic surgery

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Table 3: Students' favorable perception score after fifth objective structured clinical examination in burns and plastic surgery

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Statistical analysis

The statistical analysis was done using MedCalc statistical software. MedCalc Software Ltd Acacialaan 22 8400 Ostend Belgium. The paired t-test was used to compare the quantitative data after the first and fifth assessment tests. Statistical significance is set at 5% (P < 0.05).

Ethical consideration

The study (protocol/02/BPS) is done in accordance with declaration of Helsinki version 2013, and the identification of participants is not disclosed.


  Results Top


The opinion of postgraduate students recorded as per the feedback questionnaire [Table 1] after first and fifth assessment tests were recorded, and statistical results were tabulated in [Table 2] and [Table 3], respectively, with subsequent statistical comparison of the mean SFPS after first and fifth assessment [Table 4] using OSCE in burns and plastic surgery. The mean SFPS after the first assessment with was 30.2 ± 2.828 (mean ± standard deviation [SD]) and after fifth assessment 43 ± 2.828 (mean SD) with Student's test t = 10.119 and P < 0.0001 which is highly significant statistically in favor of OSCE after fifth assessment. This shows that there is a positive change in perception of students in favor of assessment based on OSCE in burns and plastic surgery [Figure 1].
Table 4: Comparison of the perception of postgraduate students after first and fifth objective structured clinical examination in burns and plastic surgery

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Figure 1: Line chart of students' favorable perception score after first and fifth objective structured clinical examination

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  Discussion Top


The key components of the learning climate in the medical education system are teacher, learner (student), curriculum, assessment, and evaluation. The evaluation of the learning climate and assessment tool is performed through a feedback system from the learner and teacher. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education classifies medical competence into six domains: medical knowledge, patient care, professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, systems-based practice, practice-based learning, and improvement.[1] The clinical vignette-based multiple-choice question paper is considered to be a valid tool for assessing the medical knowledge and its application in decision-making and planning while OSCE for other five domains.[1],[2] Thus, OSCE is considered the gold standard of assessment methods.[3] However, OSCE has two major drawbacks that it is expensive and time-consuming.[4] There are number of studies published which have showed a positive change in perception of undergraduate students in favor of their assessment based on OSCE.[5],[6],[7],[8],[9] The recent study also showed that the Student's perception was positive especially regarding to organization and the time attributed to each station, and furthermore, the students considered that the topics and questions applied in each station were relevant.[10] Our study has showed a positive change [Figure 1] in perception of students in favor of assessment of students in burns, plastic, and reconstructive surgical super specialty based on OSCE. Since the significance of student feedback for assessment tool in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education is being increasingly recognized,[11] we conducted such study on perception of students of plastic surgery super specialty on objective structured clinical/practical examination.

Our students were generally satisfied with assessment system as indicated by their positive feedback and high mean students' favorable score after few assessments using OSCE. However, our study was limited by sample size which can be increased in future studies and may need to augment the evidence by conducting multi-institutional or multiple such studies.


  Conclusions Top


We observed in our study that the monthly assessment based on OSCE is well accepted by the students of our subspecialty after few assessments, however, further studies are required to augment the evidence.

Ethical statement

The written consent from each participant was taken and the identity of participants has not been revealed at any stage of the study conducted in accordance with the declaration of Helsinki version 2013.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Chan CY. Is OSCE valid for evaluation of the six ACGME general competencies? J Chin Med Assoc 2011;74:193-4.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Varkey P, Natt N, Lesnick T, Downing S, Yudkowsky R. Validity evidence for an OSCE to assess competency in systems-based practice and practice-based learning and improvement: A preliminary investigation. Acad Med 2008;83:775-80.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Swing SR. Assessing the ACGME general competencies: General considerations and assessment methods. Acad Emerg Med 2002;9:1278-88.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Barman A. Critiques on the objective structured clinical examination. Ann Acad Med Singap 2005;34:478-82.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Al-Naami MY. Reliability, validity, and feasibility of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination in assessing clinical skills of final year surgical clerkship. Saudi Med J 2008;29:1802-7.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Martin IG, Jolly B. Predictive validity and estimated cut score of an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) used as an assessment of clinical skills at the end of the first clinical year. Med Educ 2002;36:418-25.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Khosravi Khorashad A, Salari S, Baharvahdat H, Hejazi S, Lari SM, Salari M, et al. The assessment of undergraduate medical students' satisfaction levels with the objective structured clinical examination. Iran Red Crescent Med J 2014;16:e13088.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Raheel H, Naeem N. Assessing the Objective Structured Clinical Examination: Saudi family medicine undergraduate medical students' perceptions of the tool. J Pak Med Assoc 2013;63:1281-4.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.
Elfaki OA, Al-Humayed S. Medical students' perception of OSCE at the department of internal medicine, college of medicine, King Khalid University, Abha, KSA. J Coll Physicians Surg Pak 2016;26:158-9.  Back to cited text no. 9
    
10.
de Oliveira FA, Porto FR, Ribeiro CG, Haddad AE, de Oliveira RG, Ferraz Júnior AM. Objective structured clinical examination, OSCEs: An advance in the teaching and learning process in the student's perception. Rev Odontol UNESP 2019;48:e20190027.  Back to cited text no. 10
    
11.
Al-Mously N, Nabil N, Salem R. Student feedback on OSPE: An experience of a new medical school in Saudi Arabia. J Int Assoc Med Sci Educ 2012;22:10-6.  Back to cited text no. 11
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1]
 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2], [Table 3], [Table 4]



 

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