Home About us Editorial board Search Browse articles Submit article Instructions Contacts Login 
Users Online: 5577
Home Print this page Email this page

 



 
Previous article Browse articles Next article 
LETTER TO EDITOR
J Edu Health Promot 2020,  9:79

Intermittent energy restriction as a health promotion strategy to improve visceral adiposity and cardiometabolic health in obese older adults


Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy

Date of Submission03-Oct-2019
Date of Acceptance25-Jan-2020
Date of Web Publication28-Apr-2020

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Chidiebere Emmanuel Okechukwu
Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome
Italy
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jehp.jehp_578_19

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Okechukwu CE. Intermittent energy restriction as a health promotion strategy to improve visceral adiposity and cardiometabolic health in obese older adults. J Edu Health Promot 2020;9:79

How to cite this URL:
Okechukwu CE. Intermittent energy restriction as a health promotion strategy to improve visceral adiposity and cardiometabolic health in obese older adults. J Edu Health Promot [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Aug 7];9:79. Available from: http://www.jehp.net/text.asp?2020/9/1/79/283365

Sir,

Excess abdominal fat is associated with imbalanced dietary pattern and excessive calorie intake among obese older adults. Intra-abdominal visceral fat lines hypertrophied adipocytes and they are characterized by augmented lipolytic activities which are resistant to the antilipolytic action of insulin.[1] Intermittent energy restriction (IER) is characterized by periods of marked energy restriction combined with normal energy intake. Energy restriction prevents type 2 diabetes mellitus and increases lifespan.[2] IER leads to improvements in insulin sensitivity, reduces lipids, and improves blood pressure.[3]

Unhealthy dietary patterns at old age coupled with the pathophysiology of aging increases central fat accumulation and adiposity. Aging adults often consume food at least 3 times daily; overconsumption of food with such eating patterns often leads to insulin resistance and poor cardiometabolic health, especially when associated with a sedentary lifestyle. IER for aging adults involves eating pattern of either 2 consecutive days of energy restriction per week or alternative days of energy restriction, 60%–85% below estimated rations, or a total fast on different days, with little or no energy intake, and foremost periods of normal food intake, on a recurring basis. One of the major benefits of IER is that the brain and other organs in the body have adapted to energy restriction, hence enhancing human performance, prevents chronic diseases, and increases longevity and neuroprotection. At least 60%–85% of IER combined with healthy dietary consumption such as Mediterranean diet every week can be effective in the management of obesity and its metabolic complications among older adults.

Increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines which is associated with aging results in an increase in oxidative stress, which causes endothelial dysfunction; this leads to cardiovascular disease and an increase in cardiovascular mortality among older adults.[4] However, IER reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines in healthy adults during Ramadan.[5] In conclusion, IER could be an effective health promotion strategy for improving weight loss, cardiometabolic health, quality of life, and longevity among obese older adults. Nevertheless, the biological effects of IER are not well established. Further experimental studies are needed to establish the long-term effects of IER on cardiometabolic risk factors in older adults. There is a need to stipulate the optimal fasting regimen, the duration of fasting interval, the number of fasting days per week, level of energy restriction needed on fasting days, guidelines for dietary consumption on non-fasting days, and the relationship between IER and physical activity in older adults.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Mittelman SD, Van Citters GW, Kirkman EL, Bergman RN. Extreme insulin resistance of the central adipose depot in vivo. Diabetes 2002;51:755-61.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Chung KW, Kim DH, Park MH, Choi YJ, Kim ND, Lee J, et al. Recent advances in calorie restriction research on aging. Exp Gerontol 2013;48:1049-53.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Harvie M, Howell A. Potential benefits and harms of intermittent energy restriction and intermittent fasting amongst obese, overweight and normal weight subjects – A narrative review of human and animal evidence. Behav Sci (Basel) 2017;7 (1):4.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Bozkurt B, Aguilar D, Deswal A, Dunbar SB, Francis GS, Horwich T, et al. Contributory risk and management of comorbidities of hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and metabolic syndrome in chronic heart failure: A scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation 2016;134:e535-e578.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Faris MA, Kacimi S, Al-Kurd RA, Fararjeh MA, Bustanji YK, Mohammad MK, et al. Intermittent fasting during Ramadan attenuates proinflammatory cytokines and immune cells in healthy subjects. Nutr Res 2012;32:947-55.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

Top
Previous article  Next article
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article
References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed247    
    Printed8    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded35    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal