Home About us Editorial board Search Browse articles Submit article Instructions Contacts Login 
Users Online: 792
Home Print this page Email this page

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 208

A comparison of learning styles of undergraduate health-care professional students at the beginning, middle, and end of the educational course over a 4-year study period (2015–2018)


1 Department of Medical Education, Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Saveh University of Medical Sciences, Saveh, Iran
2 Department of Nursing, Saveh University of Medical Sciences, Saveh, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Nayereh Baghcheghi
Department of Nursing, Saveh University of Medical Sciences, Saveh
Iran
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jehp.jehp_224_20

Rights and Permissions

BACKGROUND AND AIM: There is a growing interest in learning styles of undergraduate health-care professional students; however, the evidences about learning styles over time during undergraduate programs are rare. In this study, the learning styles of undergraduate health-care professional students from the beginning to the completion of the program were examined to determine changes in learning style over time. METHODOLOGY: This is a longitudinal descriptive study from 2015 to 2018. A total of 101 health-care professional students were selected by census method. Learning styles were evaluated using the Perceptual Learning-Style Preference Questionnaire three times in the study at the beginning (T1), the middle (T2), and the end of the educational course (T3). The data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. RESULTS: In T1, auditory (mean = 13.99) and visual (mean = 13.54) styles were preferred as major learning styles, whereas at T2, visual style (mean = 13.6) was the only preferred major learning style. At T3, the major learning styles were kinesthetic (mean = 14.32), tactile (mean = 13.98), and visual (mean = 13.58). There were statistically significant differences in auditory, kinesthetic, tactile and group scale scores between the three time points (P < 0.05). Group learning style was in the negative type at all three time points. CONCLUSIONS: Learning styles can change depending on the context, environment, teaching method, and the subject of learning material and are probably a flexible changing feature rather than a fixed inherent feature a student possesses.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed39    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded8    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal