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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 73

Effect of spiritual care education on postpartum stress disorder in women with preeclampsia


1 Department of Nursing and Midwifery School, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
2 Department of Midwifery, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
3 Department of Islamic Studies, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
4 Department of Nursing, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran
5 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
6 Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
7 Department of Midwifery, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Esfahan University of Medical Sciences, Esfahan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mahin Tafazoli
Lecturer, Department of Midwifery, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jehp.jehp_170_17

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Introduction: Posttraumatic stress disorder is an anxiety disorder that occurs after exposure to an event that causes injury or threat. The prevalence of preeclampsia was reported to be 28%. Considering the significant role of spiritual care in physical and psychological outcomes of patients, this study was conducted to determine “the effect of spiritual care education on postpartum stress disorder in women with preeclampsia”. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 72 pregnant women (36 in each group) were selected in a convenient way between the ages of 34 and 38 weeks who had preeclampsia and admitted to two public hospitals in Mashhad. The questionnaires such as Duke University Religion Index, DASS 21, the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL), and Prenatal Posttraumatic Stress Questionnaire (PPQ) were used at the beginning in two groups. In the intervention group, first, women were educated each day based on Richards and Bergin's pattern, in three sessions, which lasted 45–60 min. The control group also received routine cares. All units completed questionnaires such as Prenatal Posttraumatic Stress Questionnaire (PPQ) at the 4th–6th postpartum period. Results were analyzed by independent t-test, Mann–Whitney test, Chi-square test, and SPSS version 16. Results: The mean change score of postpartum stress disorder in the intervention and control groups was different after intervention (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Providing spiritual care to pregnant mothers with preeclampsia reduces their risk of postpartum stress disorder. Therefore, this kind of care as an effective intervention is included in the routine care of this group with high-risk pregnancies.


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